OUR SPECIALTIES


  • DIABETES

    Diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or because the cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. This high blood sugar produces the classical symptoms of polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia (increased thirst), and polyphagia (increased hunger).

    SunMed Providers and our staff are well trained and well versed with overall management of diabetes. Including; diabetes education, diet, medications and injection procedures.

  • HYPERTENSION

    Hypertension (HTN) or high blood pressure, sometimes called arterial hypertension, is a chronic medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is elevated.

    Blood pressure is summarized by two measurements, systolic and diastolic, which depend on whether the heart muscle is contracting (systole) or relaxed between beats (diastole) and equate to a maximum and minimum pressure, respectively.

  • HIGH CHOLESTEROL

    Cholesterol is a type of fat (lipid) in your blood. Your cells need cholesterol, and your body makes all it needs. But you also get cholesterol from the food you eat.To understand what happens, think about how a clog forms in the pipe under a kitchen sink. Like the buildup of grease in the pipe, the buildup of cholesterol narrows your arteries and makes it harder for blood to flow through them. It reduces the amount of blood that gets to your body tissues, including your heart.

    This can lead to serious problems, including heart attack and stroke.

  • COPD

    Also known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; chronic bronchitis; or emphysema.

    COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe. Progressive means the disease gets worse over time.

    COPD can cause coughing that produces large amounts of a slimy substance called mucus, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and other symptoms.

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of COPD. Most people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke. However, up to 25 percent of people with COPD never smoked. Long-term exposure to other lung irritants—such as air pollution, chemical fumes, or dusts—also may contribute to COPD.

    A rare genetic condition called alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency can also cause the disease.

  • ARTHRITIS

    Arthritis is a form of joint disorder that involves inflammation of one or more joints. There are over 100 different forms of arthritis. The most common form, osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease), is a result of trauma to the joint, infection of the joint, or age. Other arthritis forms are rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and related autoimmune diseases. Septic arthritis is caused by joint infection.

    The major complaint of individuals who have arthritis is joint pain. Pain is often a constant and may be localized to the joint affected. The pain from arthritis is due to inflammation that occurs around the joint, damage to the joint from disease, daily wear and tear of joint,

    muscle strains caused by forceful movements against stiff painful joints and fatigue.

  • OBESITY

    Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have an adverse effect on health, leading to reduced life expectancy and/or increased health problems. People are considered obese when their body mass index (BMI), a measurement obtained by dividing a person’s weight in kilograms by the square of the person’s height in meters, exceeds 30 kg/m.

    Obesity increases the likelihood of various diseases, particularly heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, and osteoarthritis.[2] Obesity is most commonly caused by a combination of excessive food energy intake, lack of physical activity, and genetic susceptibility, although a few cases are caused primarily by genes, endocrine disorders, medications or psychiatric illness. Evidence to support the view that some obese people eat little yet gain weight due to a slow metabolism is limited; on average obese

    people have a greater energy expenditure than their thin counterparts due to the energy required to maintain an increased body mass.

  • WEIGHT LOSS

    What Should I Look for In a Weight Loss Program?

    Make sure it is safe. Whether you create your own weight loss program or use a commercial one, make sure it is safe. A safe diet should include all of the recommended daily allowances (RDAs) for vitamins, minerals, and protein. The diet should be lower in calories (energy) only, not in essential vitamins or minerals. In general, women should choose a diet that has at least 1,200 calories a day and men should choose one that has at least 1,800 calories per day, however, speak with your doctor first.

    Slow, steady weight loss. The program should be directed toward slow, steady weight loss unless your doctor feels your health condition would benefit from more rapid weight loss. Expect to lose only about a pound a week after the first week or two. With many calorie-restricted diets, there is an initial rapid weight loss during the first one to two weeks, but this loss is largely fluid. Thus, a reasonable goal of weight loss should be expected. The rate of weight loss should be 1 pound to 2 pounds each week.

    If you plan to lose more than 15 pounds to 20 pounds, have any health problems, or take medication on a regular basis, your doctor should evaluate you before you start a weight loss program. One of our doctors can assess your general health and medical conditions that might be affected by dieting and weight loss.